spot_img

Cyber Security & Generative AI – A double edge sword

Artificial Intelligence (AI) has been a game-changer in many industries, and cybersecurity is no exception. One of the most exciting developments in this field is the use of Generative AI, a subset of AI that can create new content and ideas, including conversations, stories, images, videos, music and even code.

Generative AI can be used to automate, augment, and accelerate work. For the purposes of this article, we focus on ways generative AI can enhance work rather than on how it can replace the role of humans. And it can perform several functions in organizations, including classifying, editing, summarizing, answering questions, and drafting new content. Each of these actions has the potential to create value by changing how work gets done at the activity level across business functions and workflows.

Generative AI – The Positive Edge

In the context of cybersecurity, Generative AI can be a powerful tool for enhancing security measures and mitigating threats. Generative AI has the potential to revolutionize cybersecurity in several ways. For instance, it can be used to simulate cyber threats, allowing security teams to better understand potential vulnerabilities and develop more effective defenses. Generative AI can also be used to create realistic training scenarios, helping to prepare cybersecurity professionals for the ever-evolving landscape of cyber threats.

Google, a leading player in the AI space, has been at the forefront of using Generative AI for security use cases. The tech giant has announced a set of new services that rely on an AI model custom-tailored to security use cases. These services leverage the power of Generative AI to enhance threat detection and response, providing a more robust defense against cyber threats. A few contextual cases are as given below:

Generative AI for Threat Detection and Simulation

  • Understanding the Threat Landscape: Generative AI can be used to simulate a wide range of cyber threats, helping security teams to understand potential vulnerabilities and develop more effective defenses. By generating realistic threat scenarios, Generative AI can provide a comprehensive view of the threat landscape, enabling analysts to anticipate and prepare for various types of cyberattacks.
  • Creating Synthetic Data: Generative AI can also be used to create synthetic data that mimics real-world network traffic, user behavior, and other elements of a company’s digital environment. This synthetic data can be used to train machine learning models, improving their ability to detect anomalies and potential threats. By using synthetic data, companies can avoid the privacy and security concerns associated with using real-world data for training purposes.
  • Enhancing Threat Detection: Generative AI can enhance threat detection by generating new patterns or signatures that can be used to identify previously unseen threats. This can be particularly useful for detecting zero-day exploits, which are attacks that take advantage of vulnerabilities that are unknown to the targeted organization. By generating new patterns based on known exploits, Generative AI can help to identify potential zero-day threats before they can cause damage.
  • Automating Threat Hunting: Generative AI can also automate aspects of the threat hunting process, freeing up analysts to focus on more complex tasks. For example, Generative AI can be used to automatically generate hypotheses about potential threats, based on patterns and anomalies in the data. These hypotheses can then be tested by the security team, speeding up the threat hunting process and increasing its effectiveness.

Generative AI for Security Operations

Security Operations Centers (SOCs) are the front line of defense in the digital world, monitoring and analyzing activity on networks, servers, endpoints, databases, applications, websites, and other systems, looking for anomalous activity that could be indicative of a security incident or compromise. Training for SOCs is crucial, and Generative AI can play a significant role in creating realistic training scenarios. Here’s how:

  • Simulating Cyber Attacks: Generative AI can be used to simulate a wide range of cyber-attacks, from phishing and malware attacks to more sophisticated threats like Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs). These simulations can provide SOC teams with practical experience in identifying and responding to threats, improving their readiness for real-world attacks. For example, Generative AI could generate a realistic phishing email or create network traffic patterns indicative of a DDoS attack.
  • Creating Synthetic Data for Machine Learning: Generative AI can generate synthetic data that mimics real-world network traffic, user behavior, and other system activities. This data can be used to train machine learning models that are used in SOCs for threat detection. The advantage of synthetic data is that it can be used to represent a wide range of scenarios and threat types, providing a comprehensive training resource.
  • Automating Red Teaming Exercises: Red teaming is a practice where a group within an organization tries to simulate attacks to test the organization’s defenses. Generative AI can automate parts of this process, creating new attack scenarios and strategies that the red team can use. This can make red teaming exercises more efficient and can expose SOC teams to a wider range of threat scenarios.
  • Generating Incident Reports: Generative AI can also be used to generate synthetic incident reports, based on real-world examples. These reports can be used for training purposes, helping SOC teams to understand the types of information they need to collect and report during a security incident.

The Negative Edge: Potential for Misuse

While the potential benefits of Generative AI in cybersecurity are significant, it’s important to recognize that this technology can also be a double-edged sword. Just as Generative AI can be used to enhance cybersecurity, it can also be used to create more sophisticated cyber threats. For instance, Generative AI can be used to create malicious code that can morph and evolve, making it more difficult to detect and neutralize. A few examples given below can be created using AutoGPT or similar tools.

  • Advanced Cyber Threats: Just as Generative AI can be used to enhance cybersecurity, it can also be used to create more sophisticated cyber threats. For instance, Generative AI can be used to create malicious code that can morph and evolve, making it more difficult to detect and neutralize.
  • Deepfakes: Generative AI can create realistic but fake video or audio content, known as deepfakes. These can be used for misinformation campaigns, identity theft, and other malicious activities that can be challenging to detect and counter.
  • Social Engineering Attacks: Generative AI can be used to automate and enhance social engineering attacks, such as phishing emails or fraudulent customer service calls, making them more convincing and harder to detect.
  • Exploiting Vulnerabilities: Generative AI could potentially be used to identify and exploit software vulnerabilities more efficiently, posing a significant threat to cybersecurity.
  • Automated Exploit Generation: Generative AI tools can potentially be used to automate the creation of exploits. By feeding these tools with data about known vulnerabilities and successful exploits, they could generate new exploits for similar vulnerabilities, making the process of discovering and exploiting vulnerabilities more efficient for hackers.
  • Code Obfuscation: Generative AI tools could be used to obfuscate malicious code, making it harder for antivirus software and other security tools to detect it. By generating code that performs the same malicious actions but looks different from known malware, these tools could help hackers evade detection.
  • Automating Reconnaissance: Generative AI tools could be used to automate the process of reconnaissance, which is the initial phase of a cyber-attack where the attacker gathers information about the target. By automating this process, hackers could potentially identify vulnerabilities and plan their attacks more efficiently.

Inherent risks from Generative AI

Generative AI can also pose different risks which are not directly related to Cyber Security but to similar areas and organizations need to be aware of these. These risks include:

  • Bias: Generative AI models are trained on data that is created by humans, and this data can be biased. This means that Generative AI models can generate text that is biased, inaccurate, or offensive.
  • Malicious use: Generative AI models can be used to generate malicious content, such as fake news, phishing emails, and malware. This content can be used to deceive people, steal their personal information, or damage their computers.
  • Security vulnerabilities: Generative AI models are complex pieces of software, and they can contain security vulnerabilities. These vulnerabilities can be exploited by malicious actors to gain access to Generative AI models or to use them to generate malicious content.
  • Data privacy: Generative AI models are trained on large datasets of personal data. This data can be used to track people’s online activity, target them with advertising, or even blackmail them.

Conclusion

Like any new technological development, there is always a positive and a negatives side. It is impossible to ignore the positives just because there are a lot of negatives associated. Do people stop driving just because there are numerous road accidents? So, it is important to have a forward-looking perspective, work within the dimensions available, understand the risks and create a culture for better use of technology. By understanding the potential risks, developers and security professionals can better prepare and protect against these threats.
Here are some tips for mitigating the risks of Generative AI models:

  • Use Generative AI models in a safe and responsible way. This means being aware of the risks, and taking steps to minimize them. For example, you should only use Generative AI models to generate content that is safe and appropriate.
  • Be aware of the biases in Generative AI models. This means being aware of the data that Generative AI models are trained on, and understanding how this data can lead to bias in the output of the models. For example, if an LLM is trained on a dataset of news articles, it is likely to generate text that is biased towards the views expressed in those articles.
  • Use Generative AI models with caution. This means being aware of the potential for malicious use of Generative AI models, and taking steps to protect yourself from it. For example, you should only use Generative AI models from trusted sources, and you should be careful about what information you provide to them.

Amit Dhawan
CISO & DPO
Quantiphi

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this feature article are of the author. This is not meant to be an advisory to purchase or invest in products, services or solutions of a particular type or, those promoted and sold by a particular company, their legal subsidiary in India or their channel partners. No warranty or any other liability is either expressed or implied.
Reproduction or Copying in part or whole is not permitted unless approved by author.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest Articles

Sign Up for CXO Digital Pulse Newsletters

Sign Up for CXO Digital Pulse Newsletters to Download the Research Report

Sign Up for CXO Digital Pulse Newsletters to Download the Coffee Table Book

Sign Up for CXO Digital Pulse Newsletters to Download the Vision 2023 Research Report

Download 8 Key Insights for Manufacturing for 2023 Report

Sign Up for CISO Handbook 2023

Download India’s Cybersecurity Outlook 2023 Report